DVDs for collectors and enthusiasts

IndyCar / USAC : 1978 (Volume 2)

$17.00

Indy/USAC : 1978 (Vol 2)

 

1-DVD (125 minutes)

1978 Indy 500 Time Trials – Indianapolis, IN   (8 min)

Live TV coverage of a few qualifying runs, including Sneva and Foyt.

 

1978 Texas 200 – Texas World Speedway, TX  (94 min)

Live flag-to-flag CBS-TV coverage of the Texas 200, one of the most controversial races of the year. The Cosworth
8-cylinder engines were becoming the favored powerplant with USAC, but many teams, especially on a
shoestring-budget, were committed to using the old Offy 4-cylinder and Drake powerplants. During qualifying, USAC
mandated that all cars run a specific maximum boost pressure, which handicapped the 4-cylinder cars. USAC would not
change the rule, so the Offy powered teams filed a protest, claiming they would be uncompetitive against the Cosworth
8-cylinder cars. USAC was trying to transition to the Cosworth engine at this time, but many teams were committed to
the Offy 4-cylinders. Another controversy involved how the yellow flag was waved, and when cars were allowed to pit.
Tom Sneva was on pole at over 210 mph. As the race progressed, A.J. Foyt was dominant, and would go on to win the
race. However, many drivers, including Gordon Johncock, had mechanical problems as they stressed their Offy
4-cylinders to the max, and were very vocal about the fact that USAC would not change the rules. After the race, on live
TV, Steve Krisiloff approached A.J. Foyt in victory circle, and accused him of cheating, something that you don’t do to
Foyt, especially in Texas! One of Foyt’s crew members restrained A.J. as he was going to throw a punch at Krisiloff,
then a burly Foyt crew member bear-hugged Krisiloff and carried him away, all captured on live TV. Paul Page handled
the explosive pit lane interviews, with Ken Squier and Dan Gurney on commentary.

 

1978 USAC – The Day That Changed Super-Vee Racing  (23 min)

An amazing documentary, produced by the Montgomery Ward Auto Club in conjunction with USAC. This is a
color film focusing on the first Super-Vee race (Indy Lights) using water-cooled engines. Many teams were still
using the venerable air-cooled engines that had been a staple in Super-Vee racing since the 1960’s, and this
was considered a major change to the sport. The Super-Vee race is covered (from Phoenix), and during
yellow flags, interviews are conducted with Al Unser, Danny Ongais, Bobby Unser, and many other Indy car
drivers about the topic. Meanwhile, Tim Richmond and Tom Bagley battle it out on the track.